THE BRIDGE

tag iphone case

Fun iPhone food cases lets you taste Japan’s fall flavors

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Here in Japan, fall is a special season. It’s often described with the saying ‘Shokuyoku-no-aki’ (roughly translated as ‘fall for appetite’), a time when many ingredients including vegetables and fish can be enjoyed at their best. One Japanese company, Hamee, is bringing the special season to its series of iPhone cases, mimics food as plastic samples. Here are a few fun iPhone 5 cases that are handcrafted here in Japan. Sanma One fish eaten especially in the fall is Sanma, or Brevoort. Check out this iPhone 5 case with a very realistic and juicy piece of fish on top. It is available for 3,990 yen (about $41). Negi (Japanese onion) Negi is a magical ingredient that can make just about any food more tasty. For those who can’t get enough of it, you can always carry it with you on your iPhone. It is also available for 3,990 yen. Unagi Unagi, or broiled eel, on top of rice is called Unajyu. The flavorful smell of cooked eel with charcoal fire is irresistible, luring us into restaurants this time of the year. This unagi iPhone case comes with rice, and on the back of the transparent case, the rice is visible,…

Hamee-negi-iphonecase-inaction

Here in Japan, fall is a special season. It’s often described with the saying ‘Shokuyoku-no-aki’ (roughly translated as ‘fall for appetite’), a time when many ingredients including vegetables and fish can be enjoyed at their best. One Japanese company, Hamee, is bringing the special season to its series of iPhone cases, mimics food as plastic samples.

Here are a few fun iPhone 5 cases that are handcrafted here in Japan.

Sanma

One fish eaten especially in the fall is Sanma, or Brevoort. Check out this iPhone 5 case with a very realistic and juicy piece of fish on top. It is available for 3,990 yen (about $41).

Hamee-Sanma-iPhonecase

Negi (Japanese onion)

Negi is a magical ingredient that can make just about any food more tasty. For those who can’t get enough of it, you can always carry it with you on your iPhone. It is also available for 3,990 yen.

Hamee-Negi-iPhonecase

Unagi

Unagi, or broiled eel, on top of rice is called Unajyu. The flavorful smell of cooked eel with charcoal fire is irresistible, luring us into restaurants this time of the year. This unagi iPhone case comes with rice, and on the back of the transparent case, the rice is visible, giving it a super authentic look. It is available over on Strapya for 3,990 yen.

Hamee-unagi-iphonecase

Bacon & Egg

Another in this series to of plastic food sample iPhone case is bacon and egg.

Hamee-baconegg-iphonecase

Plastic food samples are very common in Japanese restaurants, to give customers a better idea of the food before they order. There is even an area in Tokyo called Kappabashi, where cooks can shop for cooking tools and order cooking samples that suit their menu.

These eye-catching iPhone food cases may not fulfill your appetite, but they’ll be sure to turn some heads.

Can’t find your iPhone in your purse? Tunewear has the case for you

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Women’s bags tend to be the destination for an endless number of daily items. This causes a problem. When your phone is ringing, we often struggle to find our phones among the clutter, and we sometimes even miss the call as a result. Well, worry no more! A new iPhone case from Japan solves this problem. It’s called Julia Phone Pochette by Tunewear. This iPhone case is essentially a tiny sholder bag, just big enough to hold your handset. It also comes equipped with several pockets for your IC cards (for public transport) and a pretty gold chain to strap over your shoulder. It comes in three color variations: red, pink, and green, and is available for 3980 yen (or about $42). There are a lot mobile phone accessories and decorations in Japan — some weird, some cute, some very convenient. This product reminded me of a past initiative by Softbank Selection, where they turned to Facebook to find out what kind of things women prefer for their mobile phones. It’s great to see companies paying attention to women’s needs in this way. I’m sure it’s a strategy that will pay off with big sales, especially here in Japan.

JuliaPhonePochette

Women’s bags tend to be the destination for an endless number of daily items. This causes a problem. When your phone is ringing, we often struggle to find our phones among the clutter, and we sometimes even miss the call as a result. Well, worry no more! A new iPhone case from Japan solves this problem. It’s called Julia Phone Pochette by Tunewear.

This iPhone case is essentially a tiny sholder bag, just big enough to hold your handset. It also comes equipped with several pockets for your IC cards (for public transport) and a pretty gold chain to strap over your shoulder. It comes in three color variations: red, pink, and green, and is available for 3980 yen (or about $42).

There are a lot mobile phone accessories and decorations in Japan — some weird, some cute, some very convenient. This product reminded me of a past initiative by Softbank Selection, where they turned to Facebook to find out what kind of things women prefer for their mobile phones.

It’s great to see companies paying attention to women’s needs in this way. I’m sure it’s a strategy that will pay off with big sales, especially here in Japan.

How to transform your iPhone into Nunchucks. (Yes, nunchucks!)

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Part of the beauty of Japanese mobile culture is the wide variety of accessories that you can add to your phone. And in recent years, that means lots of fun iPhone cases (see the bubble wrap or Domu-kun cases that we recently featured, for example). But Japanese manufacturer Nitto has come up with what might be the mother of all iPhone cases with its ‘Trick Cover’. The case is comprised of two hinged portions, one of which holds your iPhone, and the other makes up a flippable cover. But as you can see in the ever-so awesome video above, the magic happens when you hold one part, and swing the other part about – just a you would a pair of nunchucks [1]. Interestingly, you can hold a transit card like Pasmo or Suica in the cover portion, or even order a custom design to be printed on the exterior. The hinged case structure also allows you to prop up your iPhone at various angles for easy viewing. But you’ll most likely be far too busy fighting bad guys with your mobile nunchucks for anything as trivial as that! Trick Cover is available in black or white, and costs 3200…

Part of the beauty of Japanese mobile culture is the wide variety of accessories that you can add to your phone. And in recent years, that means lots of fun iPhone cases (see the bubble wrap or Domu-kun cases that we recently featured, for example).

But Japanese manufacturer Nitto has come up with what might be the mother of all iPhone cases with its ‘Trick Cover’. The case is comprised of two hinged portions, one of which holds your iPhone, and the other makes up a flippable cover. But as you can see in the ever-so awesome video above, the magic happens when you hold one part, and swing the other part about – just a you would a pair of nunchucks [1].

Interestingly, you can hold a transit card like Pasmo or Suica in the cover portion, or even order a custom design to be printed on the exterior.

The hinged case structure also allows you to prop up your iPhone at various angles for easy viewing. But you’ll most likely be far too busy fighting bad guys with your mobile nunchucks for anything as trivial as that! Trick Cover is available in black or white, and costs 3200 yen (or about $31). — [Via BCN Ranking]

iphone-trick-cover


  1. Nunchaku, nunchuks, whatever…  ↩

Japanese icon Domo-kun reborn as iPhone case with accompanying app

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Here’s a fun new item from the folks over at NHK. The broadcaster’s popular mascot, Domo-kun, is the model for a soon-to-be-released smartphone case. The case itself is rather large, measuring in at over 25 centimeters from his furry head to his furry toes. He comes with bendy arms, and a handy strap loop on top which you can tie into. There’s also a clever pocket around the rear into which you can slip your transit card (pictured below), assuming you plan to ride the train with Domo-kun. Your iPhone screen will display in landscape mode through Domo-kun’s famous toothy grin. And there will be an accompanying app for the case that provides a number of functions, including an alarm clock, a jukebox, touch-to-talk, and a Twitter timeline. This unusual case, created by NHK Enterprise, is going to be released in at the end of April for the price of 4,800 yen (or about $50).

domokun-iphone-case-1Here’s a fun new item from the folks over at NHK. The broadcaster’s popular mascot, Domo-kun, is the model for a soon-to-be-released smartphone case.

The case itself is rather large, measuring in at over 25 centimeters from his furry head to his furry toes. He comes with bendy arms, and a handy strap loop on top which you can tie into. There’s also a clever pocket around the rear into which you can slip your transit card (pictured below), assuming you plan to ride the train with Domo-kun.

Your iPhone screen will display in landscape mode through Domo-kun’s famous toothy grin. And there will be an accompanying app for the case that provides a number of functions, including an alarm clock, a jukebox, touch-to-talk, and a Twitter timeline.

This unusual case, created by NHK Enterprise, is going to be released in at the end of April for the price of 4,800 yen (or about $50).

domokun-iphone-case-4

domokun-iphone-case-2

domokun-iphone-case-3

Have a bubble wrap fetish? New iPhone 5 case from Japan has you covered!

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Few among us can resist the simple pleasure of popping bubble wrap. Japan’s Bandai capitalized on this widespread public fetish a few years back when it produced its Mugen Puchipuchi keychain. And now, phone accessory vendor Strapya has just released a similar product, as its new Puchipuchi iPhone 5 case brings bubble wrap goodness to the backside of the Apple’s latest smartphone. Like Bandai’s keychain, the bubbles can be popped an infinite number of times, so you can keep popping for as long as you want — or until someone comes along and punches you in the face for making a racket, whichever comes first. Check out the demo video below, which shows some lucky fellow in bubble-popping ecstacy. The case is priced at 2,100 yen (or about $23) and can be ordered from the Strapya website. Of course that case only gives you bubble popping on the back of your iPhone. But if you’d like to take care of the front too, check out the Puchipuchi kibun application for iOS which lets you pop virtual bubbles on your screen. Similarly for Android users, there’s the Hatsune Miku-themed bubble pack + miku application available on Google Play.

puchi-puchi-iphone-5-case

Few among us can resist the simple pleasure of popping bubble wrap. Japan’s Bandai capitalized on this widespread public fetish a few years back when it produced its Mugen Puchipuchi keychain. And now, phone accessory vendor Strapya has just released a similar product, as its new Puchipuchi iPhone 5 case brings bubble wrap goodness to the backside of the Apple’s latest smartphone.

Like Bandai’s keychain, the bubbles can be popped an infinite number of times, so you can keep popping for as long as you want — or until someone comes along and punches you in the face for making a racket, whichever comes first. Check out the demo video below, which shows some lucky fellow in bubble-popping ecstacy.

The case is priced at 2,100 yen (or about $23) and can be ordered from the Strapya website.

Of course that case only gives you bubble popping on the back of your iPhone. But if you’d like to take care of the front too, check out the Puchipuchi kibun application for iOS which lets you pop virtual bubbles on your screen. Similarly for Android users, there’s the Hatsune Miku-themed bubble pack + miku application available on Google Play.

Traditional Japanese art meets mobile: Paper iPhone cases from Kyoto

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If you have ever visited Japanese variety stores like LOFT or Tokyu-Hands, you’ve likely seen the tremendous choice of iPhone cases. There are even websites like Case-Mate or Society6 where you can buy uniquely designed iPhone cases which are not mass produced. But I recently stumbled across one case that could be the first made of paper — or if not the very first, perhaps the sturdiest paper case. It’s called Musubi, which means “to tie” in Japanese. It’s a product by Kyoto-based manufacturer Suzuki Shofudo [1]. The case is made from a special robust paper using stereo-chemical paper pressing technology to mold it into the shape of an iPhone. To use it, you just need to place the paper case on the front and back of the iPhone, and then attach three stickers on the sides to hold the papers together. And that’s it, you’re done! The paper appears pretty thick although I’m not sure how much protection it would provide. There are five designs included in the Musubi package, allowing you to dress up your iPhone differently depending on your mood. The designs are traditional Japanese patterns that symbolizes relationships between people. For five cases, the price is…

paperiPhonecase

If you have ever visited Japanese variety stores like LOFT or Tokyu-Hands, you’ve likely seen the tremendous choice of iPhone cases. There are even websites like Case-Mate or Society6 where you can buy uniquely designed iPhone cases which are not mass produced.

But I recently stumbled across one case that could be the first made of paper — or if not the very first, perhaps the sturdiest paper case. It’s called Musubi, which means “to tie” in Japanese. It’s a product by Kyoto-based manufacturer Suzuki Shofudo [1].

The case is made from a special robust paper using stereo-chemical paper pressing technology to mold it into the shape of an iPhone. To use it, you just need to place the paper case on the front and back of the iPhone, and then attach three stickers on the sides to hold the papers together. And that’s it, you’re done! The paper appears pretty thick although I’m not sure how much protection it would provide.

There are five designs included in the Musubi package, allowing you to dress up your iPhone differently depending on your mood. The designs are traditional Japanese patterns that symbolizes relationships between people. For five cases, the price is 1890 yen (about $20), which is generally less than the price of one iPhone case you can buy at a store. The cases are available for both iPhone 4/4S and iPhone 5.

paperiPhonecase2

The case can be bought online through the Suzuki Shofudo website if you’re in Japan, or if you’re passing through Kyoto, their store is here. We’ll let you know if they become available to overseas buyers. I’m sure that the demand for such a slick design would be pretty high!


  1. More details can be found on their website (Japanese). See this pdf for starters.  ↩