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New Japanese app helps you collect and organize your personal health data

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See the original story in Japanese. As more and more data tracking technology is developed, the advantages of keeping of a Personal Health Record, or PHR for short, become all the more apparent. The growing use of Bluetooth-enabled health care devices helps people easily track information, and visualize and manage it. Tokyo-based startup Practechs has introduced an Android app that allows you to easily collect and review your various health-related data. The app is called Health Player, and it is available for free. The app can act as a pedometer, counting your steps as well as your calories burned in a given day. You can input data manually or by connecting with other measuring instruments, recording things like body fat percentage, base body temperature, your menstrual cycle, blood pressure, and pulse. The app can leverage Felica-based NFC or Bluetooth communications, transferring collected data from various third party health care devices. The startup expects to introduce an iOS app in late June. They plan to add more functions later on, like personalized content recommendations based on the collected metrics, reward systems that motivate users to keep exercising, or social content. Around Asia, there are many players in this health space including…

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See the original story in Japanese.

As more and more data tracking technology is developed, the advantages of keeping of a Personal Health Record, or PHR for short, become all the more apparent. The growing use of Bluetooth-enabled health care devices helps people easily track information, and visualize and manage it.

Tokyo-based startup Practechs has introduced an Android app that allows you to easily collect and review your various health-related data. The app is called Health Player, and it is available for free.

health-uiThe app can act as a pedometer, counting your steps as well as your calories burned in a given day. You can input data manually or by connecting with other measuring instruments, recording things like body fat percentage, base body temperature, your menstrual cycle, blood pressure, and pulse. The app can leverage Felica-based NFC or Bluetooth communications, transferring collected data from various third party health care devices.

The startup expects to introduce an iOS app in late June. They plan to add more functions later on, like personalized content recommendations based on the collected metrics, reward systems that motivate users to keep exercising, or social content.

Around Asia, there are many players in this health space including DocDoc (health management), Doctorpage (for medical appointments), CompareClinic (online community focused medical topics) , Silverline (health and safety for the elderly in Singapore), MeetDoctor (improving healthcare though user interaction), or Dokter Gratis (doctor consultation through an app).

For those of you who would like to experiment a DIY data monitoring system, you could even try something spreadsheet-based like the so-called ‘data diet‘ which my colleague recently wrote about.